vol.011 - The 29th NIHU Symposium: Diversity of Japan’s Dietary Cultures – Thinking about Dietary Cultures on food production, processing and consumption 第29回人文機構シンポジウム 和食文化の多様性-日本列島の食文化を考える-

The 29th NIHU Symposium: Diversity of Japan’s Dietary Cultures – Thinking about Dietary Cultures on food production, processing and consumption

 

Customs on food based on the modern Japanese mentality of valuing nature were inscribed on the representative list of the intangible cultural heritage of humanity of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) under the title, “Washoku; Traditional Dietary Cultures of the Japanese,” in December 2013.

Food and its culture are closely linked to the history, climate, geographical conditions, courtesies and other so-called customs of each region. Diverse regionally rooted cuisines and customs exist in all parts of the world for that reason. However, opportunities to pass on food customs have diminished in Japan with the increasing Westernization of food in recent years. There are also concerns that food ingredients, cuisines and flavoring peculiar to each region will also become standardized with the greater movements of people and goods caused by the evolution of transportation systems and information transmission methods. The attraction of travel may be spoiled if the same ingredients are served all over Japan.

The National Institutes for the Humanities (NIHU) cosponsored the 29th NIHU Symposium titled “Diversity of Japan’s Dietary Cultures – Thinking about Dietary Cultures on food production, processing and consumption” with the Ajinomoto Foundation for Dietary Culture on Saturday, October 15, 2016. At this Symposium, lecturers answered questions about the diverse foodways found on the islands of Japan from their respective academic viewpoints and gave thought to how dining tables in Japan will look going forward.

Opening the Symposium, Isao Kumakura, the Chairman of the Washoku Association of Japan and a professor emeritus at the National Museum of Ethnology, delivered a keynote speech on the theme, “What is the Washoku Culture Inscribed on the UNESCO List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity?” In his keynote lecture, Kumakura explained the background to Japan’s dietary cultures’ inscription on the UNESCO list of intangible cultural heritage of humanity and the definition of Washoku. In a presentation that followed, Shinya Yamada, an associate professor at the National Museum of Japanese History, introduced food customs found in courtesies handed down in respective parts of Japan under the title, “Development of Courtesies and Washoku.” The third speaker, Reiko Saito, an associate professor at the National Museum of Ethnology, gave a presentation on food customs found in courtesies preserved by the Ainu under the title, “Food of the Ainu and Trade.” Next, Nobuko Kibe, a professor at the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics, introduced food ingredients used in the cuisine of Okinawa and dishes used in religious rites there under the title, “Food Culture of Ryukyu (Okinawa).” The last speaker, Tomoya Akimichi, a professor emeritus at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature and a professor emeritus at the National Museum of Ethnology, gave a presentation on the diversity of dashi (soup stocks) and soups eaten in respective parts of Japan, and referred to the contemporary dashi culture under the title, “The Essence of Washoku Explored from the Perspective of Dashi – Seaweeds, Fish and Livestock.”

In panel discussions that followed the presentations, the speakers exchanged their opinions on the definition of Washoku. Through the discussions, they reached the conclusion that protecting regional communities is important for protecting the diversity of food in Japan. Summaries of their lectures, which were distributed on the day of the Symposium, can be downloaded from the official NIHU website. The details of the Symposium are also available for viewing at the YouTube video sharing site.

 

 

 

 

第29回人文機構シンポジウム 和食文化の多様性-日本列島の食文化を考える-

 

 2013年12月、「自然を尊ぶ」という日本人の気質に基づいた食に関する「習わし」が、ユネスコ無形文化遺産「和食;日本人の伝統的な食文化」として登録されました。

 食やその文化は、地域の歴史や風土、地理的環境、儀礼など、いわゆる「習わし」と強く結びついています。ゆえに、世界のどこでも、その地域に根ざした多様な料理や習慣があります。しかし近年、日本でも食の洋風化が進み、食に関する「習わし」を伝承していく機会が減っています。また、交通機関や情報伝達法の進化により人や物の移動が活発化するにつれ、各地の食材や料理、味付けが画一化してしまうことが危惧されます。日本全国どこに行っても同じ食材しか出てこないのでは、旅の魅力が損なわれてしまうのではないでしょうか。

 人間文化研究機構(人文機構)では、2016年10月15日(土)、第29回人文機構シンポジウム「和食文化の多様性-日本列島の食文化を考える-」を公益財団法人味の素食の文化センターと共同で開催しました。このシンポジウムでは、日本列島の食の多様なありようを学術的な視点から紐解き、日本の食卓の「これから」について考えました。

 まず、熊倉功夫氏(和食文化国民会議 会長、国立民族学博物館 名誉教授)から「ユネスコの無形文化遺産に登録された和食文化とはなにか」というテーマで、日本の食文化がユネスコ無形文化遺産に登録された背景と、和食の定義について基調講演がありました。続くプレゼンテーションでは、山田慎也氏(国立歴史民俗博物館 准教授)が「儀礼の展開と和食」と題して、日本各地に伝わる儀礼における食の「習わし」について紹介しました。次に齋藤玲子氏(国立民族学博物館 准教授)が「アイヌの食と交易」と題して、アイヌに伝わる儀礼における食の「習わし」について紹介しました。続いて木部暢子氏(国立国語研究所 教授)が「琉球の食文化」と題して琉球の料理に使われている食材や祭祀における料理について紹介しました。最後に秋道智彌氏(総合地球環境学研究所・国立民族学博物館 名誉教授)が、「だし(出汁)からさぐる和食の粋―海藻・魚・家畜」と題して、だしの多様性から各地の汁物を紹介し、現代のだし文化にも言及しました。

 パネルディスカッションでは、和食の定義に関する意見交換が行なわれ、また日本の食の多様性を守るためには地域のコミュニティーを守ること大事であるとの結論でまとまりました。このシンポジウムで当日配布した要旨集は、人文機構HPからダウンロードできます。またシンポジウムの内容は、YouTubeで視聴できます。

 

nihumaganine11-1.jpg

基調講演の熊倉功夫氏

 

nihumaganine11-2.jpg

パネルディスカッション