vol.025 - An interview with research fellows visiting NIHU – Senior Lecturer Oleg Benesch

An interview with research fellows visiting NIHU – Senior Lecturer Oleg Benesch

 

We asked Senior Lecturer Oleg Benesch, a 2017 International Placement Scheme (IPS) fellow of the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), his research interests and his fellowship experience at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies (Nichibunken) in Kyoto. Oleg teaches East Asian History at the University of York in the UK.

 

Oleg, what are your research interests and what projects you are working on now?

My recent research interests have related to the use of premodern symbols and ideas in the formation of modern nationalism. Much of my work deals with the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. My first book, Inventing the Way of the Samurai (Oxford, 2014), examined the development of bushido in modern Japan. I have just completed a second book manuscript, co-authored with Ran Zwigenberg at the Pennsylvania State University, that is a history of Japanese castles in the modern period, from the 1860s to the present.

In addition to several ongoing projects related to these two books, I am increasingly looking at the uses of the past in Japan, China, and the West from a transnational and comparative perspective. The spread of nationalism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was a global phenomenon, and different societies used the past in ways that were far more similar than is often thought. For example, the development of an idealized samurai ethic in Meiji Japan was heavily influenced by Victorian notions of chivalry and ‘gentlemanship’.

 

How did you become interested in your research field?

My current historical interests developed during several years living in Japan and asking questions about things I saw and heard. With regard to bushido, I didn’t feel that the existing literature was providing satisfactory answers to my questions about its origins. This led me to study the development of bushido in graduate school, first for an MA and then a PhD.

My work on castles developed from conversations with Ran Zwigenberg in Tokyo several years ago. We both felt that too little was known about the modern history of Japanese castles, as research and museums focus almost entirely on earlier periods. As we dug deeper, we realized that castles played major roles in Japan’s modern development, but also that the dynamics surrounding castles in Japan were in many ways similar to those in Europe and elsewhere. The history of both bushido and castles is closely related to the formation of local, regional, and national identity in the modern period, and this is a thread that runs through much of my past and ongoing work.

 

Where do you see yourself in the next 5 years? 10 years?

As a historian, I try not to get drawn into predictions of the future, whether it be my own or that of the areas I study. That said, I am still engaged in quite a few research projects and would be happy if I am still pursuing those.

 

What was your most memorable moment during your IPS fellowship in Japan?

The most memorable thing about my stay in Japan on the IPS was the amazing cherry blossom season. It was considerably longer than a moment this year, and I had the good fortune to be traveling around visiting castle sites during the peak of the season.

In many cities, castles are now public parks, often planted with dozens or hundreds of cherry trees, so the atmosphere was fantastic. It was a bit strange to be looking for historically significant objects in between masses of people eating and drinking on blue tarps beneath the cherry trees, but it certainly made the whole experience more memorable.

 

What is your advice for students or early career researchers considering to do research in a different country or culture?

I would just suggest getting out and exploring as much as possible. You never know where new ideas or projects will come from!

 

 

Senior Lecturer Oleg Benesch
Oleg Benesch is Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in East Asian History at the University of York in the UK. He is also a Research Associate at SOAS, University of London. Oleg received his PhD from the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia, and was Past & Present Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research at the University of London.

Oleg’s research interests lie at the intersection of intellectual, cultural, and social history. He is especially interested in the exchange and development of ideas and concepts across societies, with a focus on interactions between Japan, China, and the West. For more information, see: www.olegbenesch.com

In his free time, Oleg enjoys spending time with family and friends, as well as exploring new areas and playing football (soccer). During his time in Kyoto, he went for cycle rides and runs in and around the city. He would often run as far as he could in a new direction, and then take one or several trains back home as a way of exploring the city and countryside. Oleg also regularly played football with students and staff at Kyoto University, as well as at a futsal court near Nichibunken. He finds this a great way to meet people from many different walks of life, especially when one has first arrived somewhere new.

 

 

 

 

そうだ人文機構、行こう - 外来研究員オレグ・ベネシュ氏の場合

人間文化研究機構(人文機構)では、2007年に英国の助成機関である、芸術・人文リサーチ・カウンシル(AHRC)と覚書を締結し、日本研究を志す英国の大学院生や若手研究者を本機構の研究機関で受入れて、研究指導を行っています。今回は、国際日本文化研究センター(日文研)で受け入れたオレグ・ベネシュ氏に、ご自身の研究活動や外来研究員としてのご経験についてお話を伺いました。オレグ氏は、現在、英国のヨーク大学で准助教として東アジア史を教えています。

 

現在の研究課題や取り組んでいるプロジェクトはどのようなものですか?

最近は、近代ナショナリズムの形成における前近代的なシンボルや思想の利用に関心があります。これまで、19世紀後半から20世紀初頭を扱った研究を多く行ってきました。最初の著書「Inventing the Way of the Samurai(武士道の創出)」(オックスフォード大学出版、2014年)では、近代日本における武士道の発展過程についてみました。そして、ペンシルベニア州立大学のラン・ツヴァイゲンバーグ氏と共著で、2冊目の著書を書き上げたところです。内容は、1860年代から現在までの近現代における日本の城の歴史です。

これらの2つの研究に関連したプロジェクトをいくつか進めるかたわら、国際的な比較研究の視点から、日本、中国、西洋における「過去」の利用についても注目しています。19世紀から20世紀に見られたナショナリズムの広がりは世界的な現象であり、一般的に考えられている以上に類似した方法で、多くの社会が過去を利用しました。例えば、明治期の日本で醸成された理想の武士倫理は、英国のビクトリア朝の騎士道観や「ジェントルマンシップ」いわゆる「紳士的ふるまい」の影響を強く受けていました。

 

この研究分野に関心を持ったきっかけは何ですか?

過去に数年間日本に住んだ経験があり、その間に見聞きしたことについて、いろいろと疑問がわいてきて、歴史に興味をもつようになりました。私が疑問に抱いた武士道の起源については、既存の研究成果では満足のいく回答が得られないと思ったのです。このことが大学院の修士や博士課程で、武士道の発展について研究を志すきっかけとなりました。

お城に関する研究は、数年前に東京で、ラン・ツヴァイゲンバーグ氏と意見交換したことがきっかけです。私たちは、日本の城の近代の歴史についてほとんど知られていない、という結論に至ったのです。これまでの研究も博物館での展示でも、そのほとんどが城の古い歴史に焦点をあてたものだからです。

深く掘り下げていくと、城が日本近代の発展に大きな役割を果たしていただけでなく、日本の城を取り巻く力学には、ヨーロッパや他の地域と多くの共通点があったことに気づきました。武士道と城、双方の歴史は、近代における地方、地域そして国家のアイデンティティの形成と密接に関連していて、まさに私がこれまで扱ってきた研究テーマと合致します。

 

5年後、そして10年後、あなたは何をしていると思いますか?

過去を扱っている歴史家としては、自分自身についても、そして私の研究分野についても、あまり未来の予測に左右されないようにしています。とはいえ、多くの研究プロジェクトに取り組んでいるので、その研究が続けていられれば、うれしいです。

 

外来研究員として日本に滞在し、最も記憶に残った出来事は何でしたか?

桜の季節がすばらしかったことが最も印象的でした。幸運なことに、例年よりも2018年春の桜の時期は長く、お花見のピークの時期に、城址の調査旅行ができたのです。

多くの都市では、城は城址公園として公開されており、数十、数百の桜が植えられています。ですから、雰囲気は最高でした。桜の下でブルーシートを広げて食べたり飲んだり、宴会をしている人達の間をぬって、歴史的な事物の調査をするというのはちょっと奇妙な感じでしたが、この経験が、さらに思い出深いものにしたのは確かです。

 

外国で研究しようとしている学生や若手研究者にアドバイスをお願いします。

外に出て、可能な限り探検すること、これに尽きます。どこで新たなアイデアやプロジェクトに出会えるかわかりませんから!

 

オレグ・ベネシュ 准教授 

ベネシュ氏は、英国のヨーク大学の東アジア史の准教授です。ロンドン大学のSOASのアソシエイト研究員、歴史学研究所のフェローも務めています。ベネシュ氏はカナダのブリティッシュ・コロンビア大学のアジア研究科で博士号を取得しました。 ベネシュ氏は、知識、文化、社会史が交わる事象に関心があります。特に、思想や概念がさまざまな社会間を行き来し、発展することに興味を持っており、日本、中国、西洋の間が相互に与えた影響に焦点を当てて研究をしています。ベネシュ氏の研究については、www.olegbenesch.comもご参照ください。

ベネシュ氏は、オフは家族や友人と一緒に過ごしたり、行ったことのない地域の探検や、サッカーを楽しんだりしています。京都滞在中には、自転車で街中や郊外をサイクリングしていました。郊外や遠くの都市を探検する方法として、行ったことのない地域に向かってできるだけ遠くまでランニングし、電車を乗り継いで帰宅していたそうです。またベネシュ氏は、定期的に京都大学や日文研の近くのフットサル場で職員や学生たちとサッカーをしていたそうです。経験上、とりわけ初めての土地に着いたばかりの時は、サッカーを通した交流は多くの人と知り合うための最善の方法といいます。