vol.026 - An interview with research fellows visiting NIHU – PhD student Lance Pursey そうだ人文機構、行こう - 外来研究員ランス・パーシーさんの場合

An interview with research fellows visiting NIHU – PhD student Lance Pursey

We asked PhD student Lance Pursey, a 2017 International Placement Scheme (IPS) fellow of the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), his research interests and his fellowship experience at the National Museum of Ethnology (MINPAKU) in Osaka. Lance is now doing his final years of his PhD course in Medieval History at the University of Birmingham, UK.


Lance, what are your research interests and what projects you are working on now?

My research interests are social identities in medieval China and Northeast Asia. For my PhD research I focus on funerary inscriptions from the Liao period (907-1125CE), and incorporate not only their textual elements but also their archaeological context where available.

During my time in Japan I became interested in how Chinese history is studied and researched in Japan, which I hope to develop into a larger project in the future. 


How did you become interested in your research field?

My undergraduate degree was in Chinese and Japanese, and afterwards I became interested in classical Chinese. My original motivation was to read philosophical texts, but I became increasingly interested in the historical context of the texts I was reading, which inspired me to do an MA in Religious Studies, focusing on Daoism, at Sichuan University in China.

Nearing the end of my MA I was lucky enough to hear about an exciting PhD project that combined historical and archaeological methodologies. This was refreshing after spending several years looking at religious and speculative philosophical texts.

My interest in inscriptions comes from both my passion for textual analysis and my interest in the material and social contexts of texts. In contrast to other periods of Chinese dynastic history, there is a shortage of received historical material for the Liao, which means that the archaeological finds since the twentieth century have played a pivotal role in uncovering more detail about the lives of individuals from the period. 

A lot of scholarship combines both artefacts and texts to paint a comprehensive picture of the Liao. I am curious to see whether these two kinds of sources when looked at in isolation paint two different pictures of Liao society, allowing us to reflect on the limitations of historical source material and historical methodologies. 


Where do you see yourself in the next 5 years? 10 years?

Five or ten years is a bit far ahead to really say for certain where I might be. My hope is that I will continue to read classical Chinese texts, and use the Asian language skills I have developed in my work. I hope to have the opportunity to share what I get out of them, be it through classroom teaching, publishing or other platforms. 

The IPS fellowship definitely opened up my eyes to possible future projects and opportunities internationally, and I am currently seriously considering pursuing postdoctoral study in Japan after completion of my PhD.


What was your most memorable moment during your IPS fellowship in Japan?

I would say my visit to the Toyo Bunko in Tokyo. It’s a wonderful library with very helpful, courteous and professional staff. On my visits I was able to handle and examine rubbings of Liao inscriptions made or purchased by Japanese archaeologists in the 1930s. Some of these fragile sheets of taped-together paper are some of the only material remains of stone inscriptions whose whereabouts has been unknown for the best part of a century. 

I then had the opportunity to run a workshop at Waseda University, and chose to read through these inscriptions with teachers and students, alerting them to the fact these rubbings were very accessible and they could go check them out for themselves.

That aside, the museums in Japan are great! The National Museum of Ethnology, where my placement was, gave me fresh perspectives for thinking about ethnic groups in the past and present and how to apply anthropological frameworks to my research. I was also very fortunate to catch many great exhibitions, some that directly fed into my research interests, like the Song ceramics exhibitions at the Idemitsu Museum of Arts, or the Tang tomb figurines exhibition at the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka. Other exhibitions expanded my interests beyond the immediate focus of my PhD, such as the Ninna-ji treasures on display at the Tokyo National Museum, the exhibition of Giga (Edo period manga) at the Osaka City Museum of Fine Arts, or the brilliant permanent displays at the Edo-Tokyo Museum


What is your advice for students or early career researchers considering to do research in a different country or culture?

Above all, go for it. You will learn things that you did not know there were to learn. If you do go on a placement, try your best to get out and meet people while you are there.

I originally set out thinking I was going to Japan to read the volumes and volumes of work done in Japanese on my period of research. However, at the beginning of my placement I was encouraged to actively reach out to the writers of the works I wanted to read and go along to their seminars. 

This allowed me to see how the practice of sinology and history is done in Japanese in person, rather than merely on the page. This helped to turn my research from something quite dead (I deal with tomb inscriptions, after all) into activities where I was engaging with living people and indeed the living traditional of Sinology in Japan.


PhD student Lance Pursey
Lance Pursey is enrolled in a PhD program at the University of Birmingham, UK to study Medieval History under the supervision of Professor Naomi Standen. Lance received his BA in Chinese studies with Japanese from Sheffield University, and an MA in Religious Studies, specialising in Tang period Daoist thought, from Sichuan University, China. 

Lance is also involved in the AHRC Research Project ‘Understanding cities in the premodern history of Northeast China, c. 200-1200’ as a project student. His PhD research topic is epigraphy, historical geography and urban society in the Liao period (907-1125 northeast Asia); it combines GIS, database design, archaeology and history. Lance will complete his PhD in 2019. From January to June 2018, he went on the AHRC IPS fellowship to the National Museum of Ethnology, Japan.

In the weekends and some evenings during his placement Lance often trained in Aikido. He also went on long walks and visited different smaller towns in the North of Osaka, like Takatsuki and Ibaraki. He was always on the lookout for small cafes that did good tea and cheesecake.




pursey-lance-photo.jpg

 

 

 

そうだ人文機構、行こう - 外来研究員ランス・パーシーさんの場合

人間文化研究機構(人文機構)では、2007年に英国の助成機関である、芸術・人文リサーチ・カウンシル(AHRC)と覚書を締結し、日本研究を志す英国の大学院生や若手研究者を本機構の研究機関で受入れて、研究指導を行っています。今回は、2017年度に国立民族学博物館(民博)で受け入れたランス・パーシーさんに、ご自身の研究活動や外来研究員としてのご経験についてお話を伺いました。パーシーさんは現在、英国のバーミンガム大学の中世史コースの博士課程に在籍しています。
 

現在の研究課題や取り組んでいるプロジェクトはどのようなものですか?

私は中世における中国と北東アジアの社会的アイデンティティについて研究をしています。学位論文や現在進めている研究では、中国の遼王朝(907-1125年)の墓碑に刻まれている文面に注目しています。銘文に書かれている要素だけでなく、墓碑がどのような状態で何と一緒に発掘されたかなどの考古学的な側面もできるだけ考察に取り入れています。

日本に滞在している間、中国史が日本においてどのように学ばれ、研究されているかということに興味を持ちましたので、今後、プロジェクトとして発展させていきたいと考えています。
 

この研究分野に関心を持ったきっかけは何ですか?

私は学部時代に、中国語と日本語を専攻していました。その後、中国の古典に興味を持つようになりました。もともと哲学書を読みたいと思っていたのですが、読み進めるうちに、哲学書が書かれるに至った歴史的背景にも徐々に関心をもつようになりました。そして、中国四川省の四川大学で、宗教学の修士課程に進学して、道教に着目するに至ったのです。

修士課程を終える頃、幸運なことに、歴史学的な研究手法と考古学的な研究手法を組み合わせた、素晴らしい研究プロジェクトに出会い、大学院生としてこのプロジェクトに参画できることになりました。それまでは、宗教的な哲学書や思弁哲学の書物漬けの数年間だったので、とても新鮮に感じました。

墓碑文への興味は、碑文の文面を分析したいという動機と、碑文の物質的、社会的な文脈への関心が合わさっています。中国の他の王朝と比べると、遼王朝から受け継がれてきた史資料は多くありません。遼王朝の市民の生活を理解するうえで、20世紀以降の考古学的な発見が、重要な役割を果たしてきたのです。

これまでの多くの先行研究は、遺物と史料の双方を組み合わせて遼王朝の全体像を描きだそうとしてきました。遺物と史料を個別に調査したときに、それぞれに基づいて異なった遼社会が描きだされるのか否か。史料と歴史学的な研究手法の限界について考えさせられるのではないかと期待しています。


5年後、そして10年後、あなたは何をしていると思いますか?

5年後、10年後というのはあまりに先のことで、自分がどうなっているのか想像できないのですが、これまでのように中国の古典を読み、研究活動を通して習得してきたアジア諸国の言葉を使っていたいと思います。教育現場、出版、あるいはその他の媒体でもかまいませんが、これまで得たものを共有できる機会に恵まれればと思います。

今回の外来研究員という経験を通じて、今後、手がけてみたい研究プロジェクトや国外で研究する可能性について、気づきを得ました。博士号を取得したら、ポスドクとして日本に戻ってこれないかと真剣に考えています。
 

外来研究員として日本に滞在し、最も記憶に残った出来事は何でしたか?

東京にある東洋文庫を訪問したことです。職員が非常に協力的で、礼儀正しく、専門性が高くて、素晴らしい図書館でした。東洋文庫では、遼王朝の碑文を写し取った拓本を手にとって調査することができたのです。拓本は、1930年代に日本の考古学者によって製作された、あるいは購入されたものでした。いくつかの資料は、もろく複数の紙がテープで貼り合わせてあり、所在が一世紀ちかく知られていなかった碑文の写しだったのです。

これらの碑文を教員や学生達とともに読むワークショップを早稲田大学で開催する機会を得ました。東洋文庫の拓本は、非常にアクセスしやすく、ワークショップの参加者自身が実物を手に取ることもできるという話をしました。

それはさておき、日本の博物館は素晴らしいです!私の受け入れ先だった国立民族学博物館では、過去、そして現在の民族についての考え方や、私の研究に人類学的な枠組みの取り入れ方といった、新鮮な視点が得られました。また、幸いにも、出光美術館の「神秘のやきもの 宋磁」展や大阪市立東洋陶磁美術館の「唐代胡人俑―シルクロードを駆けた夢」展などの素晴らしい展覧会が開催されており、観ることができました。私の研究にも関連する展覧会もありました。このほかにも、東京国立博物館の「仁和寺と御室派のみほとけ」展や、大阪市立美術館の「江戸の戯画」(江戸時代の漫画)展、江戸東京博物館の華麗な常設展示などは、博士論文で扱っている研究テーマを超えて、私の興味関心が広がるきっかけをくれました。
 

外国で研究しようとしている学生や若手研究者にアドバイスをお願いします。

とにかく、挑戦してみてください。想像を超える学びがあることは間違いありません。受け入れ先が人文機構の研究機関に決まったら、滞在中は、できるだけ外出して人と出会うようにするのがいいと思います。

はじめ、日本での滞在期間中は、日本語で書かれた資料をひたすら読むことになるだろうと想像していました。ですが、日本での生活が始まったころ、論文や書籍の著者に積極的に連絡をとって、セミナーに参加することを勧められました。

こういったアドバイスのおかげで、中国学や歴史学の研究が、単に紙の上だけではなく、日本の研究者がどのように進めているのかを肌で感じることができました。無機質な私の研究(墓碑文を扱っていますし)を、生きている人々と関わりを持ち、生きた日本の伝統的な中国学と関わりをもつものへと変えてくれたのです。
 

ランス・パーシーさん
ランス・パーシーさんは、英国のバーミンガム大学の博士課程に在籍中で、ナオミ・スタンデン教授の指導のもと、中世史を学んでいます。パーシーさんはシェフィールド大学で中国研究(副専攻:日本語)を学び、中国の四川大学で唐時代の道教思想について修士論文をまとめました。

パーシーさんは、AHRCの研究プロジェクト「北東中国の前近代史(200-1200)における都市の理解」に大学院生として参画しています。博士論文の研究テーマは、遼(北東アジア)の叙事詩、歴史地理学、都市社会で、情報地理学(GIS)、データベース設計、考古学そして歴史を組み合わせた研究を行っています。パーシーさんは2019年に博士課程を修了する予定です。2018年1月から6月まで、国立民族学博物館に外来研究員として滞在しました。

滞在期間中、週末や夕方に合気道の練習に励んでいました。また、長い時間散歩にいったり、高槻や茨城といった、大阪の北部の小さな町を訪れたり、していました。おいしいお茶とチーズケーキが味わえる小さなカフェをいつも探しながら散歩を楽しんでいました。